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Slackware 9.0 Installation Guide

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Overview/Introduction

Welcome to my installation guide for Slackware 9.0. I have prepared these instructions to assist students in installing Slackware when enrolled in the Linux courses I teach for the University of Alabama-Huntsville. I hope you find them useful.

In the past, Linux has had the reputation of being hard to install and configure. This was true when I first started using Linux about 1994. Luckily for us, things have improved nicely and installing Linux is no longer the long complex process it once was.

Many distributions of Linux provide a graphical setup program that is both easy to use and very attractive. However, many of those programs make a lot of decisions for you in an effort to be helpful. I can remember using RedHat's installation program and cursing the fact that I choose to use the simple Workstation option to install the system, only to discover that it had totally reformatted my hard drive and wiped out my copy of Windows. Some people might claim that is a good thing. I was glad it was a test machine and not my main workstation.

The first distribution of Linux I ever tried was the Slackware version. Slackware focuses on stablity, simplicity and security, not on pretty graphical tools. I have tried various other distributions over the years, but in the end I always returning to Slackware where things just seem more logical. Therefore this guide only covers installing Slackware Linux.

To get started, you will need to either purchase or download a copy of Slackware. The Slackware web site offers both ways for you to obtain Slackware. If you decide not to purchase Slackware, you will need a CD-ROM burner that can handle an ISO image and burn it to a blank CD. This can be done using Windows if needed.

Once you have the CD-ROM, it is time to begin the installation.

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